HEALTH

Why Aren’t More Americans Getting Screened for These Cancers?

PBS NewsHour

Why Aren’t More Americans Getting Screened for These Cancers?

Many Americans are not getting screened for cancer, putting them at risk of missing out on earlier intervention or receiving a late-stage diagnosis, according to a recent report from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PBS NewsHour's Laura Santhanam reports on screening rates for cervical cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, all of which are lower than federal targets.

Disrupting the Opioid Epidemic: A KET Forum

Disrupting the Opioid Epidemic: A KET Forum

Disrupting the Opioid Epidemic: A KET Forum

As death rates from opioid overdoses continue to rise, KET convenes the top experts in the state and a live studio audience to look at Kentucky's evolving response to this devastating epidemic. The program is part of KET's continuing coverage of the opioid crisis.

Help! Constant Care for My Mom Has Created Financial Turmoil

PBS NewsHour

Help! Constant Care for My Mom Has Created Financial Turmoil

In his Making Sen$e blog, PBS's Philip Moeller answers readers' health care questions oriented around seniors and their needs, including providing information about federal financial assistance for family caregivers.

Kentucky’s Proposed Medicaid Waiver

Kentucky Tonight

Kentucky’s Proposed Medicaid Waiver

Renee Shaw and guests discuss Medicaid. Scheduled guests: Adam Meier, secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services; Rep. Addia Wuchner, R- Florence, chair of the House Health and Family Services Committee; Jason Bailey, executive director, Kentucky Center for Economic Policy; and Rep. Joni Jenkins, D-Shively, member of the House Health and Family Services Committee and member of the Medicaid Oversight and Advisory Committee.

How Do Medigap Plans Work? Here’s a Tutorial

PBS NewsHour

How Do Medigap Plans Work? Here’s a Tutorial

In his latest question-and-answer column on aging and retirement for PBS NewsHour, journalist Philip Moeller discusses Medigap insurance packages that cover the cost of medical care not covered by Medicare A and B policies.

Challenges Facing Kentucky’s Children

Connections with Renee Shaw

Challenges Facing Kentucky’s Children

Dr. Terry Brooks, executive director of Kentucky Youth Advocates, talks about data trends in the 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book concerning the well-being of Kentucky kids.

In Oregon, Adult Foster Care Offers Support for the Elderly

In Oregon, Adult Foster Care Offers Support for the Elderly

In a bid to meet the demand for long-term care in the U.S., which is expected to grow in the coming years, some states are turning to adult foster care to offer aging adults physical assistance and emotional support. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Joanne Elgart Jennings reports from Oregon, where adult foster care has existed for more than 40 years, as part of an ongoing series of reports called “Chasing the Dream,” which reports on poverty and opportunity in America.

Funding Cuts, Premium Increases and the Future of Obamacare

PBS NewsHour

Funding Cuts, Premium Increases and the Future of Obamacare

President Trump’s effort to eliminate the Affordable Care Act was stymied by the Senate last year, but he hasn't stopped trying to undermine it. On PBS NewsHour, William Brangham asks New York Times health care correspondent Margot Sanger-Katz about recent funding reductions for enrollment navigators, whether coverage for preexisting conditions is in jeopardy, and the future of the ACA.

Legislators Create Task Force on Opioid Abuse

Connections with Renee Shaw

Legislators Create Task Force on Opioid Abuse

Renee speaks with State Representatives McKenzie Cantrell and Joni Jenkins of South Louisville about convening a task force of professionals and community members to study and address the opioid abuse epidemic in their district.

The Age Plateau: New Study Suggests, at Certain Age, Risk of Death No Longer Increases

PBS NewsHour

The Age Plateau: New Study Suggests, at Certain Age, Risk of Death No Longer Increases

A new study in Science suggests that humans haven’t yet hit their limit on longevity and that a person's risk of dying actually decreases after they reach the age of 80 until age 105. These findings, based on demographic research of elderly Italians, add to an ongoing debatea about longevity among medical scientists. A report from STAT News published by PBS NewsHour.